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The Hate U Give - THUG (GF 8-10 ANS)

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Un roman coup de poing sur la question universelle du racisme et des violences policières ! Résumé : Starr a seize ans, elle est noire et vit dans un quartier difficile, rythmé par les guerres entre gangs, la drogue et les descentes de police. Tous les jours, elle rejoint son lycée blanc situé dans une banlieue chic ; tous les jours, elle fait le grand écart entre ses deux Un roman coup de poing sur la question universelle du racisme et des violences policières ! Résumé : Starr a seize ans, elle est noire et vit dans un quartier difficile, rythmé par les guerres entre gangs, la drogue et les descentes de police. Tous les jours, elle rejoint son lycée blanc situé dans une banlieue chic ; tous les jours, elle fait le grand écart entre ses deux vies, ses deux mondes. Mais tout vole en éclats le soir où son ami d'enfance Khalil est tué. Sous ses yeux, de trois balles dans le dos. Par un policier trop nerveux. Starr est la seule témoin. Et tandis que son quartier s'embrase, tandis que la police cherche à enterrer l'affaire, tandis que les gangs font pression sur elle pour qu'elle se taise, Starr va apprendre à surmonter son deuil et sa colère ; et à redresser la tête. La haine qu'on donne traduction de l'anglais The Hate U Give. THUG


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Un roman coup de poing sur la question universelle du racisme et des violences policières ! Résumé : Starr a seize ans, elle est noire et vit dans un quartier difficile, rythmé par les guerres entre gangs, la drogue et les descentes de police. Tous les jours, elle rejoint son lycée blanc situé dans une banlieue chic ; tous les jours, elle fait le grand écart entre ses deux Un roman coup de poing sur la question universelle du racisme et des violences policières ! Résumé : Starr a seize ans, elle est noire et vit dans un quartier difficile, rythmé par les guerres entre gangs, la drogue et les descentes de police. Tous les jours, elle rejoint son lycée blanc situé dans une banlieue chic ; tous les jours, elle fait le grand écart entre ses deux vies, ses deux mondes. Mais tout vole en éclats le soir où son ami d'enfance Khalil est tué. Sous ses yeux, de trois balles dans le dos. Par un policier trop nerveux. Starr est la seule témoin. Et tandis que son quartier s'embrase, tandis que la police cherche à enterrer l'affaire, tandis que les gangs font pression sur elle pour qu'elle se taise, Starr va apprendre à surmonter son deuil et sa colère ; et à redresser la tête. La haine qu'on donne traduction de l'anglais The Hate U Give. THUG

30 review for The Hate U Give - THUG (GF 8-10 ANS)

  1. 4 out of 5

    Emily May

    The truth casts a shadow over the kitchen—people like us in situations like this become hashtags, but they rarely get justice. I think we all wait for that one time though, that one time when it ends right. Maybe this can be it. There are those books that are important and timely, worthy of reading because of the social and/or political message that they send. They fill a gap in the market; they make waves. They need to exist. And there are other books that are well-written, emotionally-charged The truth casts a shadow over the kitchen—people like us in situations like this become hashtags, but they rarely get justice. I think we all wait for that one time though, that one time when it ends right. Maybe this can be it. There are those books that are important and timely, worthy of reading because of the social and/or political message that they send. They fill a gap in the market; they make waves. They need to exist. And there are other books that are well-written, emotionally-charged and unputdownable - books that are not important as such, just really fucking good. But, on occasion, you find one of those rare wonderful creatures that is both important AND really fucking good. The Hate U Give is one of those books. I could tell you that this book is inspired by the "Black Lives Matter" movement. I could tell you that it rips unapolegetically into a subject that needed to be ripped into - the shootings of unarmed black people by police officers, as well as racial bias in the justice system. I could tell you that it opened my eyes to aspects of white privilege I never considered. All of that needs to be said, for sure, but I feel like I'm doing this book a disservice by highlighting its sociopolitical importance over the fact that it's also a fantastic, powerful and utterly unforgettable book. I don't know what your experiences were as a child, but when I was young, I remember my parents giving me a talk about how if I was ever lost or in trouble, I should look for a police officer. They would protect me, look after me, and make sure I got back to my parents unharmed. They are the people in society we should be able to trust. But the black protagonist of this book - Starr - gets a very different talk. About how to behave around police officers so she doesn’t get arrested. Or shot. Unfortunately, her friend - Khalil - never got that talk. I’ve seen it happen over and over again: a black person gets killed just for being black, and all hell breaks loose. I’ve Tweeted RIP hashtags, reblogged pictures on Tumblr, and signed every petition out there. I always said that if I saw it happen to somebody, I would have the loudest voice, making sure the world knew what went down. Now I am that person, and I’m too afraid to speak. The Hate U Give is about how Starr deals with the aftermath of witnessing Khalil being shot by a cop for... doing absolutely nothing wrong. Her fear is palpable as she confronts a system that she knows is working against her. She's afraid to speak out, yet angry that Khalil's murderer could escape justice. We see, through Starr's eyes, how the media presents young black men as guilty until proven innocent - and when you're poor, black, and from a rough neighborhood, it's virtually impossible to appear innocent. Though, at its heart, this book first and foremost captures the perspective of a scared young girl. A girl with a loving family, complicated friendships with white teenagers at her school, and a white boyfriend. The relationship dynamics run alongside the fight for justice and are no less compelling. Thomas deftly portrays complex, nuanced relationships between all the people in the book, considering the divides between Starr and her white classmates, but never allowing anyone to become cliche or one-dimensional. Little humorous gems lay scattered throughout the dialogue: Momma reaches her fork onto my plate and breaks off a piece of pancake. “What is Tumblr anyway? Is it like Facebook?” “No, and you’re forbidden to get one. No parents allowed. You guys already took over Facebook.” “You haven’t responded to my friend request yet.” “I know.” “I need Candy Crush lives.” “That’s why I’ll never respond.” It's incredible how The Hate U Give manages to both break your heart and warm it in the space of just a few pages. What else can I even say? If you want to have your heart ripped out - read this book. If you want to read a great book about a girl dealing with family and relationships - read this book. If you want to cry, laugh, and then cry some more - read this book. If you're ready to change this stupid fucking world - read this book. Blog | Facebook | Twitter | Instagram | Youtube

  2. 5 out of 5

    Drew

    This is a book I've been avoiding reviewing. I finished The Hate U Give a while back, rated it two stars, but never dared write any of my thoughts about it - why? Because every single review I've seen of this book is 4 stars or above and showers it in seemingly endless praise. When it seems like you're the only person in the world who didn't like a book, reviewing it can be a little intimidating. Also, this book focused on an incredibly sensitive topic nowadays - racism. Now, before I start making This is a book I've been avoiding reviewing. I finished The Hate U Give a while back, rated it two stars, but never dared write any of my thoughts about it - why? Because every single review I've seen of this book is 4 stars or above and showers it in seemingly endless praise. When it seems like you're the only person in the world who didn't like a book, reviewing it can be a little intimidating. Also, this book focused on an incredibly sensitive topic nowadays - racism. Now, before I start making my points and telling you why I didn't like a book that is supposedly anti-racism, when I, myself, am anti-racist, let's go over the definition of "racism." According to the dictionary, racism is the prejudice, discrimination, or antagonism directed against someone of a different race based on the belief that one's own race is superior. If someone works at a coffeeshop and a customer comes in of a different race and they treat them badly, because of their race, that's racist. If someone says "you're stupid because you're ___ (insert race here)," that's racist. If someone thinks they're better than you simply because of the color of that person's skin, that's racism, folks. Now, if a person were to stop talking with someone because they felt uncomfortable with that person's skin color, wouldn't that be racism? Wouldn't treating someone with hostility just because of their race, something they can't help, and are born with, be racist? Then what, I ask you, is this: “You can’t even tell me what’s going on!” “You’re white, okay?” I yell. “You’re white!” Silence. “I’m white?” he says, like he’s just hearing that for the first time. “What the f***’s that got to do with anything?” The person who said "you're white," who has no other reason besides this prejudice to be angry and stop talking to a white person, is Starr Carter, the narrator of this supposedly anti-racist book. After Starr's black friend, Khalil, is unjustly shot by a white police officer, Starr immediately zeroes in on the fact that the police officer was white. Suddenly every white person looks evil to her and she worries that she, a black girl, could be killed next. “I kneel beside my dead friend in the middle of the street with my hands raised. A cop as white as Chris points a gun at me. As white as Chris.” Now, I love that this book focused on an unjust police shooting, but I think the author took a wrong turn when she decided to focus on "blacks" and "whites." My question is: why was the police officer's skin color the main focus of this book? Shouldn't the fact that he's a police officer who unjustly shot somebody be the reason for Starr getting so angry about her friend's death? Black people are unjustly shot by police officers, yes, but so are white people. To quote a good article about the statistics of police shootings that you can read here: “…When a black man is killed by a cop, do we grieve more because there are 46 million of us as opposed to 198 million whites? I doubt it: most Americans never hear about the white men’s deaths at all. Rather, we operate according to a meme under which cops casually kill black men under circumstances in which white men are apparently let off with a hand slap—and occasional cases of just that are what often get around social media, suggesting that they are the norm.” It is not normal for a black person to be killed by a police officer, and when the officer won't own up to his mistake (like the one in this book), I am fully supportive of whatever non-violent protesting people want to do. What I won't support is the slogan that gets slapped on alongside these riots: All police officers hate black people or All white people are racist and should own up to their "white guilt." These statements are ludicrous and this book sent out both of those messages loud and clear. *takes deep breath and prepares for the onslaught of comments coming my way* Now that I'm done talking about the message, I can tell you what I thought about the book itself: It was boring. Seriously. I expected a fast-paced contemporary, but the plot was slow and the characters weren't developed enough for me to connect with them. With such weak writing, The Hate U Give could have been about rainbows and unicorns and I still would have given it two stars.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Emma Giordano

    This is a MUST READ for 2017 releases. I absolutely adored this book. I truly don't feel like it has a single flaw. Every topic addressed was approach so wonderfully and did not hold back. If you're looking for a diverse read that stands out amongst most YA, The Hate U Give is the book for you. I love Starr Carter so much. She's honestly such an inspiration to girls looking to find their voice. She is resilient, authentic, and everything we need in adolescents today. Although she is not comple This is a MUST READ for 2017 releases. I absolutely adored this book. I truly don't feel like it has a single flaw. Every topic addressed was approach so wonderfully and did not hold back. If you're looking for a diverse read that stands out amongst most YA, The Hate U Give is the book for you. I love Starr Carter so much. She's honestly such an inspiration to girls looking to find their voice. She is resilient, authentic, and everything we need in adolescents today. Although she is not completely fearless, she embraces the adversity in her way and stands against it. I don't know many people who could juggle the stresses in her life and come out weapons (in this case, words) blazing. Every moment in this book just filled me with pride for this girl and it was a pleasure being able to watch her grow. I also love the family dynamic in this book. I think it honestly might be the most healthy, realistic, close-knit family I've ever read in a YA. The siblings may tease each other, but they protect each other fiercely. The parents may not always get along, but they are head over heels in love. They always attempt to do what is best for their children, even if it may not be their own personal preference. It was so nice to have just a scene of a family sitting down to watch sports together, throwing a pool party, always working together. It is something I truly valued from this read. The strongest aspect of this book is it's social commentary and political criticism. This is the kind of book that should be in the hands of teens, making them aware of current issues, educating them on pressing matters, and encouraging them to get involved to create change. I absolutely left this read with an entirely new perspective I will carry with me in the future. It poses many important questions about racism, police brutality, discrimination, and prejudice while also answering them in a comprehensive and inviting way. It was fascinating to see the integration of such a powerful movement implemented into an accessible form of media for teens. I truly don't think you can leave this book without SOMETHING that will have made you say "I never thought about it this way", "When you put it this way, that actually makes a lot of sense.", and "I'm glad someone finally told me this." Although this book is full of important moments related to the current state of marginalized populations, it is primarily about using your voice. I believe this book has the power to make readers realize just how much their words matter. Starr Carter is a perfect example of an individual who feels their voice does not matter but through courage, risk-taking, and ultimate strength, she realizes how crucial it is to speak up for what you are passionate about no matter how terrifying the consequences may seem. And I believe you will leave this book with that revelation as well. I cannot recommend this book enough. It's absolutely one of my favorite books of the year. I am so happy The Hate U Give exists, and I'm even more ecstatic that it is a 1! NYT best seller, out in to the world, ready to help teens realize how important they really are. Please pick up "THUG". You will not regret it.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Kai

    “What's the point of having a voice if you're gonna be silent in those moments you shouldn't be?” Every white person on this planet needs to read this book. "Lack of opportunities. Corporate America don't bring jobs to our communities, and they damn sure ain't quick to hire us. Then, even if you do have a high school diploma, so many schools in our neighbourhoods don't prepare us well enough. Our schools don't get the resources to equip you. It's easier to find some crack than it is to find a good “What's the point of having a voice if you're gonna be silent in those moments you shouldn't be?” Every white person on this planet needs to read this book. "Lack of opportunities. Corporate America don't bring jobs to our communities, and they damn sure ain't quick to hire us. Then, even if you do have a high school diploma, so many schools in our neighbourhoods don't prepare us well enough. Our schools don't get the resources to equip you. It's easier to find some crack than it is to find a good school around here. Now think 'bout this. How did the drugs even get in our neighborhood? This is a multibillion-dollar industry. That shit is flown into our communities but I don't know anybody with a private jet. Drugs come from somewhere, and they're destroying our community. You got folks like Brenda, who think they need them to survive, and then you got the Khalils, who think they need to sell them to survive. The Brendas can't get jobs unless they're clean, and they can't pay for rehab unless they get jobs. When the Khalils get arrested for selling drugs, they either spend most of their life in prison, another billion-dollar industry, or they have a hard time getting a real job and probably start selling drugs again. That's the hate they're giving us, a system designed against us. That's Thug life." This book opened my eyes. I don't want to say too much, but I love how popular this book is, being No. 1 on the NYT bestseller list and already having cast Amandla Stenberg as the lead actress in the movie adaption. We need this, America needs this, YA fiction needs this. Angie Thomas gets so many things right, and so many readers can learn about black culture, cultural appropriation, covert and internalized racism and so much more through this. Apart from that, this book is simply good. It could be a biography, that's how realistic it feels. The characters have depth, the plot isn't overly dramatic but still exciting. And honestly, it's so so hilarious. Doesn't matter if the characters are joking about Voldemort or getting their butts whooped by their parents, it's laugh-out-loud material. The first few pages might be a little difficult to get through because it takes a while to get used the writing and the slang, but it's worth to keep going, believe me. The thing is, I wasn't overly emotional while reading this. I didn't cry ugly tears or had my heart broken. This is no TFIOS. But it's real and it's perfect. Another thing I love is when authors turn out to be huge Potterheads. There is nothing I enjoy more than a good Harry Potter reference, or five. Find more of my books on Instagram

  5. 5 out of 5

    Lola

    ‘‘A hairbrush is not a gun.’’ This doesn’t make any sense. And I hope that to you, too, it will not make any sense. Starr may only be sixteen, but she has already witnessed two murders in her life: the first of a young black girl in a drive by and the second of a young black boy shot multiple times by a cop. While she was in the car. Even though they didn’t do anything wrong. Even though he was unarmed. ‘‘A hairbrush is not a gun.’’ Does that make any sense to you? You can’t just kill someone be ‘‘A hairbrush is not a gun.’’ This doesn’t make any sense. And I hope that to you, too, it will not make any sense. Starr may only be sixteen, but she has already witnessed two murders in her life: the first of a young black girl in a drive by and the second of a young black boy shot multiple times by a cop. While she was in the car. Even though they didn’t do anything wrong. Even though he was unarmed. ‘‘A hairbrush is not a gun.’’ Does that make any sense to you? You can’t just kill someone because, to you, they look threatening. Are you a seer? Can you predict that they will reach for a gun and kill you with it? No, you cannot. (Even then it wouldn’t be completely right.) You have no right to take an innocent life like that. Inspired by the Black Lives Matter movement, this important novel tackles issues of race in society involving the black community of people and authority figures, more precisely, police officers. Starr was never taught to fear cops, but she was taught to be smart around them. Do what they ask, even if what they ask for makes no sense. But because of what has happened to her childhood friend Khalil, she becomes scared. Scared enough to speak up about what she witnessed, though? Will she gather her courage to do what is right? ‘‘A hairbrush is not a gun.’’ This story needed to be told. It has been told orally and on paper many times before, unfortunately, but it was time someone wrote a book dealing with social issues of race like the ones here for a young audience. For young people are dying. Young black people. Black boys. Black girls. This novel educates. It may be fictional in the sense that Angie Thomas created this story using fictional characters, but what happens in it is scary real. It does feel like it was written for white folks, but it sure as hell didn’t need to be written for black ones specifically. ‘‘A hairbrush is not a gun.’’ Blog | Youtube | Twitter | Instagram | Google+ | Bloglovin’

  6. 5 out of 5

    Hailey (HaileyinBookland)

    This was such a heartbreakingly honest account of what is happening in America right now. As a white reader, the experience this story affords its readers cannot be taken for granted. Inspired by the Black Lives Matter movement, this book takes you into the heart of Garden Heights after the main character has witnessed the wrongful murder of her best friend Khalil by a police officers. Being Canadian, as well as being white, I have the privilege of not having to deal with any of the things Starr This was such a heartbreakingly honest account of what is happening in America right now. As a white reader, the experience this story affords its readers cannot be taken for granted. Inspired by the Black Lives Matter movement, this book takes you into the heart of Garden Heights after the main character has witnessed the wrongful murder of her best friend Khalil by a police officers. Being Canadian, as well as being white, I have the privilege of not having to deal with any of the things Starr deals with on a day to day basis but the experience of being alongside her as she grappled with the injustice of it all gave me a completely new understanding of what is going on in America. I obviously am not ignorant to it all, but this just felt like an honest firsthand account. It really is indescribable. This is such an important read and I highly encourage you to pick it up. I will do a full spoiler free review and spoiler discussion on my channel very soon.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Em

    THE TRAILER FOR THE MOVIE GAVE ME ACTUAL GOOSEBUMPS I CAN’T WAIT TO WATCH IT MULTIPLE TIMES — When you're reading books like The Hate U Give, you're reading someone's decision against silence. This book has made me feel every single possible emotion at the same time. It was truly incredible and I have SO MUCH to say about it I wish I could actually just send everyone a howler containing the entire script of this book instead. “What's the point of having a voice if you're gonna be silent in those m THE TRAILER FOR THE MOVIE GAVE ME ACTUAL GOOSEBUMPS I CAN’T WAIT TO WATCH IT MULTIPLE TIMES — When you're reading books like The Hate U Give, you're reading someone's decision against silence. This book has made me feel every single possible emotion at the same time. It was truly incredible and I have SO MUCH to say about it I wish I could actually just send everyone a howler containing the entire script of this book instead. “What's the point of having a voice if you're gonna be silent in those moments you shouldn't be?” In all honesty, The Hate U Give has made me realize just how simply clueless I was as to the continuing day-to-day actuality of systemic racism in America. A reality in which on any given day, some innocent person like Tommy Le can get shot hours before his high-school graduation because he was carrying a pen, or another innocent person like Sandra Bland can get into a car, and then three days later she is going to end up dead in jail, or a five years old child can get shot and wounded after the police kills his mother. A reality in which justice is dead and the police kills black youth with impunity. And so many other real stories I read about that truly made the atoms making up my body have enough of being anchored to this awful reality in this human form and wish to move on, become a light wave or something. See, I don’t know what it's like to be black in America, but I have 18 years of experience in being a brown Muslim woman and I can tell you this: being in the minority is like being stuck behind a glass wall and whenever an injustice occurs, you breathe onto it and you write it in HUGE letters in the condensation...but nobody seems to really see it. Nobody seems to really see you. You’re completely and utterly alone. (x) The Hate U Give is about institutional racism and a broken criminal justice system where the police can violate the civil rights of thousands of people publicly and openly with almost no consequence at all. It's about what happens when racialized and marginalized communities stand up for their rights in any visible way whatsoever. It’s about how piles and piles of evidence showing sustained corruption and racism and literally hundreds of civilian deaths per year at the hands of the police is still somehow not enough to delegitimize a deeply flawed system. It's about how instead of standing in unwavering solidarity with the non-violent protests by Black Lives Matter in the face of actually violent, overtly discriminatory and often fatal actions by the police and demanding societal redress and justice, there will always be people who will decry and get enraged by it, people who will try to justify those injustices by any means to curb their own cognitive dissonance. “A hairbrush is not a gun.” I mean, this is the 21st century. We evolved. America had elected its first black president. Humanity must've left ‘racism’ back up in the trees from the jungles we descended from.... right? Maybe there just aren't many “social experiments” on YouTube where privileged folks get to dress up like oppressed groups and have cameras following them around in order to find out that racism is real, since apparently you really need the personal account of a white non-Muslim girl who tries on a hijab for a week to find out that racism and islamophobia do indeed exist, or a straight person pretending to be gay to find out that homophobia does exist, or an able-bodied person pretending to be disabled to find out that ableism does exist. You don't need any “social experiments” to understand oppression. You don’t need to plagiarize lived experiences when you can just listen. Not to the personal accounts filtered through a white person but listen to the testimonials of all the people of color across the globe who experience these issues first hand - no matter what their socio-economic standing is, and who are ignored when they actually reach out to educate you even though they shouldn't even have to. No one should have to debate about whether or not they should have basic human rights. No one should be expected to be the mouth piece for an entire group. No one should have to defend their humanity at every single step, repeatedly and constantly. But racism does exist. And I don't usually comment on other people's reviews, but if you’ve read this book and chose to ignore the important message it conveys to get offended over the main character’s remark about the way white people call 'target' tar-jay and “hey hey that’s racist!” because you think a harmless joke could possibly equate thousands of black lives unjustly killed every year at the hands of the police, or say “but what if it was the other way around?" when you have zero concept of power dynamics and historical context, you are missing the point. Now you can justify your outrage by bringing up the definition of racism like I’ve seen so many people do, but I don’t think dictionary definitions will help you there when they are the most basic forms of words and often can’t even be taken in a sociological sense. Just like how they won’t help with the usual cries of ‘reverse racism’ or even the moronic nonsense like trying to claim that anti-Islamic bigotry is not racist because “Islam is not a race”. It won’t change the fact that members of marginalized groups suffer under the yoke of all forms of social inequality, from racism to misogyny to ableism to so much more on a daily basis. It won't change the fact that these words are a constant, inevitable factors of the lives of the minority, all found on different levels of existence, all carrying various levels of trauma. I think Scott Woods said it best when he said that racism is bigger than just “conscious hate”. That it might look like hate but it is just one manifestation. And privilege is another. Access is another. Ignorance is another. Apathy is another. “You can destroy wood and brick, but you can't destroy a movement.” Khalil's story is one I will never forget, just like I won't forget all the real stories this book has opened my eyes to. (x)

  8. 5 out of 5

    may ❀

    Update 11/1/2017 I wanted to just clarify a few things from my original review bc I feel like some things were lost in translation ha i'm not going to be like deleting mass amounts of the review, just adding like little captions for further explanation. All the opinions are my own based off my life experience and knowledge as a Canadian PoC. I cannot talk on behalf of anyone else. Anyways, just ignore me. Update: you don't understand how fricken sorry I am for having this fricken review reappear on Update 11/1/2017 I wanted to just clarify a few things from my original review bc I feel like some things were lost in translation ha i'm not going to be like deleting mass amounts of the review, just adding like little captions for further explanation. All the opinions are my own based off my life experience and knowledge as a Canadian PoC. I cannot talk on behalf of anyone else. Anyways, just ignore me. Update: you don't understand how fricken sorry I am for having this fricken review reappear on your feeds, honestly I've GENUINELY considered DELETING it bc of all the misery its caused in my life (that's what I get for having a fricken opinion) but then what would that show about this community being open minded and tolerant to different voices? but I want to bring to attention something that I said some time ago in the comments that might have been perceived as hurtful and I honestly did not mean it in that way at all. (and no this isn't me trying to cover up anything, i'll explain) So, I commented something along the lines of how 'the world is reaching a point where coloured people are becoming more privileged that white people' and honestly, as a person who fits in multiple minority groups and is not black or white, I didn't MEAN that in the way it came out. I honest to goodness meant it as a hyperbole and it was written in a moment of haste and frustration. NEVERTHELESS, I take full responsibility if i was misunderstood. At the time, I was very irritated with the thread bc it felt like people were just commenting to insult me and had no care for my opinion or feelings or just any manners whatsoever. As you can probably see by scrolling through the comments (a lot of them are brash and immature) and I stopped replying and I even physically had to stop myself to coming back to read the comments bc they were making my life miserable. But I do realize how it could be interpreted in a harmful manner and I apologize if it was. Again, no one has to agree or believe me, I just wanted to take responsibility for my actions and be mature about it. I'M REALLY SORRY THIS IS BACK ON YOUR FEED. PLEASE FORGIVE ME. ACTUAL REVIEW: Before you start this review I’d like to ask you to put on your Objective Glasses on for a moment. You’re not obliged to agree with me or disagree with me, but I would most definitely appreciate if you hear my arguments before you go ahead and give judgement. Also, I’m entitled to my opinions and you’re entitled to your opinions, and discussions are encouraged but please remember to keep it respectful. Kaythxhaveagooddaybai. ~Minor Spoilers Ahead but they are MARKED~ Prepare for controversy. Reverse Racism *I wanna get back to this point in the bottom There were numerous moments when Starr wanted to break up with her boyfriend Chris on the sole basis of, ‘he’s white.’ “You’re white, okay?” I yell. “You’re white!” Silence. “I’m white?” he says, like he’s just hearing that for the first time. “What the f*ck’s that got to do with anything?” “Everything! You’re white, I’m black. You’re rich, I’m not.” Secondly, towards the ending of the book (view spoiler)[ when Starr, her brother, Seven, her boyfriend, Chris, and DeVante were at Garden Heights in the middle of a riot (hide spoiler)] this conversation takes place: “I swear, I don’t understand white people. Breadcrumbs on macaroni, kissing dogs on the mouth—” “Treating their dogs like they’re their kids,” I add. “Yeah!” says DeVante. “Purposely doing shit that could kill them, like bungee jumping.” “Calling Target ‘Tar-jay,’ like that makes it fancier,” says Seven. “F*ck,” Chris mutters. “That’s what my mom calls it.” Seven and I bust out laughing. “Saying dumb shit to their parents,” DeVante continues. “Splitting up in situations when they clearly need to stick together.” I understand that this scene is all in good fun, but it made me feel VERY uncomfortable while I was reading it. Now I want you to use those objective glasses we talked about earlier and objectively tell me, that if this was reversed with races, everyone wouldn’t be flipping crap over it, because I’m positive they would. Here’s a rule I like the stick with: if I’d find it offensive if it was pinned on me, I don’t speak it. It’s not worth it to hurt someone for a silly joke. Now the reason why I found this to be irking to read was bc there was a moment in the book where a kid at school (i think it was Starr's friend??) made a fried chicken joke and another moment where someone made some stereotypical asian joke. They were both hurtful and gross and they were called out by the other characters! Rightfully so! That's how harmful stereotypes should be dealt with, so seeing a scene where it's done, even in GOOD FUN, to a white person, it just...it feels wrong to me. Exaggeration Now most of the book felt very real. I was constantly impressed by how the author was able to convert reality into fiction, however there were parts of the book that I felt were just EXAGERATED in order to make the crime worse by tenfold. So towards the ending, havoc is being wrecked and the kids are in a really tight situation and in a few seconds, they are able to snap some fingers (while also doing really silly, questionable ish and then in 10 pages EVERYTHING is solved and i was still left reeling (i'm sure people who read the book know what i'm referring to) just, it seemed unrealistic and tiny of an ending for me Personal Points I found this book to be very LONG for a contemporary. It took me over 20 days to finish this book and I DON’T take that long to finish books. It lost my attention one too many times and I thought could be condensed down to a 300 paged book rather than 400+ pages. *The whole thing with reverse racism is that people claim that because white people never faced a calamity on a racial scale, then racism cannot be committed against them. Well, let’s take a trip down history lane. . . . . .during the 19 and 20th century, Irish immigrants were treated like slaves in North America. They were called “filthy people” by the other citizens, they were depicted as gorillas in drawings, and they were refused work and housing on the SOLE basis that they were Irish. ^so many people have talked about the definition of racism/discrimination/xenophobia etc. and honestly this stuff hurts my brain so i won't get into that stuff but I'm really all over the place rn, so let's simplify. What’s my point? My point is that I will stand against racism, but I will stand against all types of racism. I will NOT stand for Black racism, or Brown racism, or Asian racism, or Arab racism, or White racism. One is as bad as the others and while I understand the message this book is trying to portray, making racist remarks about white people, even in passing, is not okay. That’s defeating the whole purpose. I've noticed a culture beginning to grow on social media esp. tumblr, twitter etc. in which people poke fun and say crap about white people with the idea that 'they are the race in control' so it's totally fine to make fun of them. And seriously guys its so icky. WHY CANT WE JUST BE NICE TO EACH OTHER SHEESH. It’s simple. Respect people, respect nations. Don’t point fingers or pass the cruelty you faced on to another; that doesn’t solve anything, it just makes it worse. I want to be in a world where everyone is comfortable enough to be themselves and be proud of their ethnicity without feeling alienated and pointing fingers at each other does NOTHING to help that. With that said, I AM NOT SAYING THIS BOOK IS RACIST. IT IS N O T ITS THE OPPOSITE OF RACIST This review is just a girl ranting about her feelings, like how i do for every other book i read. On a positive note, I do feel that this entire book has a very very very strong and important message and the author conveyed it beautifully. The positive family dynamics was one of the best I’ve ever read about in YA. I would 11/10 recommend this book. It was very emotional to read about Starr’s journey and I very much enjoyed the book but you don’t need me to point of the positive aspects of this book. There are thousands of reviews doing just that, so that's why I reserved this review for the parts of the novel that made me uneasy. (i hope this stuff has cleared up some of the misunderstandings some people might have thought) in conclusion - this book is so bloody important and i think everyone should read it - however, just like with all pieces of literature, it can be criticized but that does not take away from the importance of the book - so idk, chill Thanks for listening all, I’d greatly appreciate your thoughts concerning the topic if you so please. :) 3.5 stars!!! ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ Buddy read with these crazies, Amy ♡♡ & Praggs ♡♡ So much hype with this book !!

  9. 5 out of 5

    Adam Silvera

    GET READY, WORLD!

  10. 5 out of 5

    Sabaa Tahir

    A thoughtful, honest and fantastic book. One of 2017's shining stars for sure. Highly, highly recommend.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Samantha

    This is one of the best audiobooks I've listened to all year. If you are considering reading this one, listen to it. You wont regret it.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Melanie

    It has taken me a long while to compose this review, because this book is the most powerful book I've ever read. It is important, educational, and happening in our world right now as you're reading this review. If you can only read one book in 2017, please pick this one. This book is inspired by the #BlackLivesMatter movement, where sixteen-year-old Starr witnesses her best friend, who is an unarmed black boy, be killed by a police officer. Starr is scared to speak up, constantly battling what t It has taken me a long while to compose this review, because this book is the most powerful book I've ever read. It is important, educational, and happening in our world right now as you're reading this review. If you can only read one book in 2017, please pick this one. This book is inspired by the #BlackLivesMatter movement, where sixteen-year-old Starr witnesses her best friend, who is an unarmed black boy, be killed by a police officer. Starr is scared to speak up, constantly battling what to do, because there is never any justice for these heartless killings. This book is real, honest, and it's going to make a lot of people uncomfortable, but being uncomfortable is necessary to change. And this book is going to change a lot of people's lives. I hope everyone reads this and starts educating themselves on, and will stop ignoring, the problems going on in today's world. Books are the most powerful and influential tool we have, and The Hate U Give is a literary masterpiece that will be a constant reference for years to come. “That's the problem. We let people say stuff, and they say it so much that it becomes okay to them and normal for us. What's the point of having a voice if you're gonna be silent in those moments you shouldn't be?” Important things that I want to say: • Reverse racism doesn't exist. • White people will never know what it feels like to be a marginalized black person who is still being oppressed in 2017. You might think you do, but you don't. • When you say #AllLivesMatter, even when coming from a place of good, it is hurtful and ignoring the greater problems that are prevalent. • When you say #BlueLivesMatter it actually makes me feel sick to my stomach, especially after reading this book. Stop doing this. I don't care if your dad is "one of the good cops out there"; it is disrespectful for this plague of an epidemic that is happening to our black men and women. • I can do better and I can do more. We can do better and we can all do more. • Here is a list of some unarmed black men that have been killed over the past few years by the police brutality that is ever growing in the United States: Trayvon Martin, Michael Brown, Eric Garner, Dontre Hamilton, Eric Garner, John Crawford III, Michael Brown Jr., Michael Brown Jr., Dante Parker, Akai Gurley, Tamir Rice, Rumain Brisbon, Jerame Reid, Tony Robinson, Phillip White, Eric Harris, Walter Scott, Freddie Gray, Keith Lamont Scott, Philando Castile, Alton Sterling, and more that go unnamed and unanswered every day. Remember these names. Honor these names. Open your eyes. See what is going on in our world and see how wrong it is. It is easy to ignore when it is not happening to you, but is this really the kind of world you want to live in? Open your heart; be empathetic to your fellow human. Let's change this, and have The Hate U Give be the first stepping stone. “You can destroy wood and brick, but you can't destroy a movement.” Thank you, Angie Thomas; I truly hope your book changes this world. Lastly, I want to emphasize that this review is coming to you from a young, white, immensely privileged woman. These are five amazing people of color giving amazing heartfelt reviews on YouTube that showcases why this book is the most important and influential book of our time. Here are a few of the people we should need to be listening to: • BooksAndBigHair • TheBookArcher • Lily Meade • iLivieforbooks • the (book) supplier Blog | Twitter | Tumblr | Instagram | Youtube | Twitch

  13. 4 out of 5

    Larry H

    Wow. Just wow. In my life so far, I've had the opportunity to experience many different things, but there are certain things I'll never get/have to experience. For example, I'll never experience childbirth, not that I'm complaining, although I once had a cortisone shot in my hip flexor, and my orthopedist said she thought those hurt just as badly. (You can debate on that.) I'm also fortunate enough that I'll never have to worry about the police viewing me as a threat as soon as they see me, just b Wow. Just wow. In my life so far, I've had the opportunity to experience many different things, but there are certain things I'll never get/have to experience. For example, I'll never experience childbirth, not that I'm complaining, although I once had a cortisone shot in my hip flexor, and my orthopedist said she thought those hurt just as badly. (You can debate on that.) I'm also fortunate enough that I'll never have to worry about the police viewing me as a threat as soon as they see me, just because of the color of my skin. I'll never have to think about the possibility of a routine traffic stop turning into something more dangerous just because a policeman gets nervous. That's something I take for granted, but I won't now that I've read Angie Thomas' searing, powerfully moving The Hate U Give . Starr is 16 years old. She feels like there are two of her—the devoted daughter who lives in a poor neighborhood and saw her best friend get killed in a drive-by shooting when they were 10, and the student at the fancy prep school her parents sent her and her brothers to in order to get them out of the ghetto, the student who doesn't speak the way she does at home, and lets very few people into her "real world." Even her boyfriend at school, Chris, with whom she watches reruns of The Fresh Prince of Bel-Air doesn't know the "real" Starr, although he says he wants to. "Funny how it works with white kids though. It's dope to be black until it's hard to be black." One night while Starr is at a party in her neighborhood, she runs into her childhood friend Khalil. Khalil was her first crush, and although she hasn't seen him for a while, it feels good to reconnect. When a fight breaks out at the party, the two leave before things get out of hand. Not long afterward, police pull Khalil's car over, and before they know it, Khalil gets shot and killed by the cop. He was unarmed. Khalil's death throws Starr and her family into a tailspin. The media has already branded Khalil a drug dealer and a thug. Starr doesn't feel like she can tell her friends at school what happened because that would be exposing them to a part of her she has tried to keep hidden, but she is angered by the attitude of one of her friends toward Khalil's shooting. Starr is afraid of the ramifications of telling the truth of what happened that night to police, prosecutors, everyone—what if police target her family? What if others think she should just keep her mouth shut? And will speaking up make the difference anyway, if most of the time white cops don't pay the price for shooting black people? "I've tweeted RIP hashtags, reblogged pictures on Tumblr, and signed every petition out there. I always said that if I saw it happen to somebody, I would have the loudest voice, making sure the world knew what went down. Now I am that person, and I'm too afraid to speak." Starr's involvement in Khalil's death uncovers friction in a number of places—between her parents, who argue about the merits of getting their family out of their neighborhood versus their responsibility to making sure it doesn't die; between her father and his nemesis, the leader of a powerful gang, who is intertwined with Starr's family in too many different ways; between her and Chris, as well as her friends at school; and between the factions of their neighborhood and others in the community, some who riot for the sake of rioting and don't care what destruction they cause, and some who understand the power of their actions. The Hate U Give is tremendously moving and just so current given what is happening in our society. While certainly it focuses on police brutality and the anger minorities feel when the authorities don't get punished for doing wrong, it is quick to point out that not all police are bad, just as not all black people are drug dealers, gang members, or looking to do harm. This is a book about racism, but it's also a book about family, friendship, loyalty, community, and how often it truly does take a village to save someone. This is a book that addresses the plight that many young black men face, but it doesn't place the blame on anyone but them, either. I thought Thomas did a great job with this book, making sure it wasn't too heavy-handed in its messaging or too extreme in its plot. She created characters you grew to care about, characters you were invested in, so when pivotal events occurred, you were moved by them. This really blew my mind, and I think this is a book which really deserves all of the hype it is getting. Several times in the book Starr's mother uttered the quote, "Sometimes you can do everything right and things will still go wrong. The key is to never stop doing right." I hope The Hate U Give reaches those despairing whether doing the right thing is still worth it even if it doesn't get the result they want. Because it really, truly is. See all of my reviews at http://itseithersadnessoreuphoria.blo....

  14. 5 out of 5

    C.G. Drews

    This has got to be one of the most hyped books in the existence of YA evers. And you know what? It is 5000% WORTHY of that hype and more and basically get thee to this book and read it as soon as possible. It perfectly combines a really important story about #BlackLivesMatter and speaking up for it with absolutely excellent writing and storytelling. Like, dude, this book is important and one of the best contemporaries. So I have to admit: the character are what makes it that just something incred This has got to be one of the most hyped books in the existence of YA evers. And you know what? It is 5000% WORTHY of that hype and more and basically get thee to this book and read it as soon as possible. It perfectly combines a really important story about #BlackLivesMatter and speaking up for it with absolutely excellent writing and storytelling. Like, dude, this book is important and one of the best contemporaries. So I have to admit: the character are what makes it that just something incredibly special for me. Starr was SO winning and rootable (shh that's a word) and I loved how she was so complex and had such personality and was so honestly relatable. And then the book focuses SO much on family!! Be still my beating heart. <3 I looooove books about family and Starr has the kind of parents YA is in desperate need of: in love, supportive, respectful of each other, and bringing their kids up the best they can be. LIKE HOLD ME I'M FLAILING. (Also it was really refreshing to have teens that respect their parents...because I can't tell you how sick I am of how many books I encounter were the kids are just selfish disrespectful jellyfish. That wasn't how I was brought up so it's like nice to see kids who can talk to their parents about anything, LOVE THEM FIERCELY, and also do not dare muck up too bad or they'll get in huge trouble. I love it.) Basically Starr calls her parents her OTP and....dude yes. I also absolutely adored all the secondary characters. Like they were ALL so real and complex?!?? It wasn't like "oh here I am reading a piece of paper". More like "oh here I am being with these humans who are like totally alive to me". SO THAT'S INCREDIBLE. A+ for writing at every corner basically. And I absolutely adored Starr's older brother Seven, and Sekani the younger bro was adorable too although entirely annoying...as younger siblings are. And then Starr had an epic Asian friend (and also a racist friend whom we all want to kind of smack into the middle of next week...that gets dealt with tho). And even DeVante was just adorable and I love how his story line went. Oh oh see this is the thing?!?? EVERY character had their own storyline. EVERY. SINGLE. ONE. And that's why this book is so good and the story so real. OTHER LIST OF THINGS I LOVED: • Starr has friends who are women, like god bless, this shouldn't be irregular but it is in a lot of books • there is SO MUCH FOOOOOOOOOD • Starr has a super sweet relationship with her uncle as well • It's funny!! It's such a serious story line but there are still quips and TONS of time where I was grinning like a dork • It's #ownvoices • It's unfair but it also shines light into the world, so I feel sad but GOOD finishing it and I think it just sent an excellent message in a really hopeful way I do have to admit two things were not my favourite. And that would be (1) it's very long...I have yet to meet a contemporary that is nearly 500 pages that I think should be that long. Erm, SORRY. Concise = my friend. And (2) I didn't feel very much chemistry AT ALL between Starr and her white boyfriend, Chris. They both seemed to be a bit of a problem to each other. But ya know, it's a sweet romance and I didn't not ship it, I just think it was definitely the weakest part of the book. (view spoiler)[Especially since basically every second scene with them Starr was having an issue with Chris being white. I am white so obviously I don't want to say anything ignorant here. I think Chris was trying?? But then he also said dumb stuff too that Starr corrected him on and he took it...so that was great! I think the calling out was ALWAYS well done and needed in this book. I just can't see these two staying together??? But I hope they do!! (hide spoiler)] Also I really learnt a lot about the #BlackLivesMatter movement. It was really good to just be reading this and knowing it's #ownvoices and just taking it all in. The horror that is the justice system is so sickening. And I was so scared for everyone's lives and just knowing HOW REAL THIS IS made an impact. No one should have a friend die in front of them, and Starr has it happen twice. It's heartbreaking. This is such an important book. It tackles racism and police violence and the corrupt justice system head on. ALL IN ALL: go read it, obviously. I mean, what else is there to say?!?? The writing is beautiful and incredible, there are so many perfect sentences that I was underlining in my kindle, and I loved Starr and her incredibly family so much. <3 It's a SAD book but also a HOPEFUL one. (And mate, I'm a fantasy reader addict, so look at me go, loving a contemporary so much.) *** QUOTES *** Note: these are taken from an ARC so don't use them anywhere! They might not be the final edits! "Brave doesn't mean you're not scared, Starr," she says. "It means you go on even though you're scared. And you're doing that." "So she unfollowed your Tumblr thingy," Momma says, proving why she can never have one. I feel like shit right now. I can't believe I let Hailey say that. Or has she always joked like that? Did I always laugh because I thought I had to? That's the problem. We let people say stuff, and they say it so much that it becomes okay to them and normal for us. What's the point of having a voice if you're gonna be silent in those moments you shouldn't be? Funny. Slave masters thought they were making a difference in black people's lives too. Saving them from their "wild African ways". Same shit, different century. I wish people like them would stop thinking that people like me need saving. "Daddy, you're the worst person to watch Harry Potter with. The whole time you're talking about" -- I deepen my voice '''Why don't they shoot the nigga Voldemort?'" "Ay, it don't make sense that in all them movies and books, nobody thought to shoot him." "Sometimes you can do everything right and things will still go wrong. The key is to never stop doing right."

  15. 5 out of 5

    Melisa

    When you read a 444 page book in one day bc you can’t put it down. Powerful. Yeah, I don’t think I can write a review for this one other than to say everyone (of a certain age/maturity) should read this. Poignant, important and timely.

  16. 5 out of 5

    karen

    congratulations, 2017 goodreads choice winner in both best YA fiction AND best debut goodreads author!! i rarely read realistic YA - if i’m going to read YA, i prefer fantasy or survival stuff where teens are in peril. but this was recommended to me by too many people to put aside "for later,” and while there are plenty of teens in peril, this sure ain’t fantasy. it earns every one of its rave reviews; it’s an important, timely book that doesn’t feel as though it was thrown together in order to c congratulations, 2017 goodreads choice winner in both best YA fiction AND best debut goodreads author!! i rarely read realistic YA - if i’m going to read YA, i prefer fantasy or survival stuff where teens are in peril. but this was recommended to me by too many people to put aside "for later,” and while there are plenty of teens in peril, this sure ain’t fantasy. it earns every one of its rave reviews; it’s an important, timely book that doesn’t feel as though it was thrown together in order to cash in on its timeliness. something like this could’ve easily skewed exploitative or preachy, and it doesn’t. at all. this was not thrown together, this was crafted. the voice is there, the emotional depth is there, it’s got strata for days, and its adaptation potential is a no-brainer - the family and neighborhood warmth-with-warts of spike lee (and my heart recognizes none but delroy lindo as maverick carter), and the focus of kids caught up in/on the outskirts of the game of the wire with a female gaze both of those (largely) lack. it’s smart, occasionally subtle food for thought with plenty of appeal for adult readers. i’d go on, but i’m so late to reading this, i’m just one more admiring voice in a sea of positive response, and if you are even later than me, reading my garbage-words is just keeping you from reading this, and that’s no good. two thumbs down for that prom scene, but everything else is gold. come to my blog!

  17. 5 out of 5

    Elyse

    Audiobook: A VERY NON-TRADITIONAL REVIEW: - just sharing....not really a review... My typical days are like boot camp lately -walking between 7-10 miles a day -PLUS an hour circuit weight resistance class ( 4 mile walk to class from my house) -- then I often walk to a cafe - eat & drink something - check-in with Goodreads -- try to touch base with this community- a few 'one-on- one' chatting exchanges--during my sitting break. Sometimes I try to talk into the phone while I walk. Typos exposed Audiobook: A VERY NON-TRADITIONAL REVIEW: - just sharing....not really a review... My typical days are like boot camp lately -walking between 7-10 miles a day -PLUS an hour circuit weight resistance class ( 4 mile walk to class from my house) -- then I often walk to a cafe - eat & drink something - check-in with Goodreads -- try to touch base with this community- a few 'one-on- one' chatting exchanges--during my sitting break. Sometimes I try to talk into the phone while I walk. Typos exposed! Before walking to my weight residence class - I'm often at the gym at 5 AM-- a few weights & stretching to begin - then an hour to 90 minutes of cardio 'while' reading from my paper white - BEFORE THAT....I've read in bed a few hours 'before' the gym.... Exhausted yet? For relaxation-- I've added back an OLD FARTS YOGA CLASS.....AN EASY CLASS .... much too easy for me --but it's perfect! The breathing alone and time for inner blessings -private time to experience being 'one' with the world - hoping to be a better person, is worth the extra time spent in class. I send out blessings to family & friends while I'm in my own space on my own yoga mat. ( very private & personal but real for me).... Why am I sharing this? I retired from traditional reviews--- but I may write a few NON- TRADITIONAL REVIEWS as my way to feel connected with people here I love and am forever thankful for!!! After receiving the crappy diagnosis of osteoporosis on July 3rd this year --I knew I had to make changes. Take the yucky medication - and not fight it.. GET THE CORRECT AMOUNT OF CALCIUM in my diet not under-eat... and get out of the chair. Writing reviews that take an hour or more won't build bone density. So-- I started downloading as many audiobooks I could get my hands on - free- from the library overdrive. I paid for a few too. Getting ready for walking- moving daily boot camp - reading included. When I finished "The Hate U Give".... taking my turn at this book, which I recommend everyone take THEIR TURN, ....I still had about 1 more mile walk home. I was DYING TO CONNECT WITH MY DAUGHTERS. This book did that to me. So.... HOW DOES A MOM CONNECT WITH THEIR ADULT KIDS WHEN THEY ARE HUNDREDS OF MILES AWAY - and they can't talk at the moment? Perfect solution: play music that reminds you of them!!! So-- I immediately listen to Aerosmith, "Don't Want to Miss A Thing", from Armageddon---Ali insisted on playing that song as her 'opening song' at her Bat Mitzvah.....nothing Jewish about it!- and we have a luv/thing with Aerosmith together. For Katy - I played "Someone Else's Story" from the Broadway Musical "Chess". It's such a beautiful song ( listen to it). Katy use to sing it often! She always brings tears to my eyes when she sings it. Her voice is beautiful. And how does ANY OF THIS RELATE TO "The Hate You Give"? I have no idea .... other than all these emotions - thoughts & feelings ARE ASSOCIATED with THIS BOOK. Somehow they are all tied together!!!! I'll leave you with one sentence in this book that - for me - represents the context of this beautiful- heartbreaking story. "A Good Garden Needs A Good Conversation". 5 Strong stars!!! I vote the audiobook!

  18. 4 out of 5

    Candace

    After reading this book, I can certainly see what all the uproar is about. 'The Hate U Give' addresses the very sensitive issues of race relations and police brutality in a time when the nation is torn over these issues. Most of my friends are at one extreme or the other when it comes to the #Blacklivesmatter movement. Since I don't want to incite an online mobbing, I'm going to do my best to avoid that movement specifically, while sharing my thoughts and opinions on this wonderful book. First of After reading this book, I can certainly see what all the uproar is about. 'The Hate U Give' addresses the very sensitive issues of race relations and police brutality in a time when the nation is torn over these issues. Most of my friends are at one extreme or the other when it comes to the #Blacklivesmatter movement. Since I don't want to incite an online mobbing, I'm going to do my best to avoid that movement specifically, while sharing my thoughts and opinions on this wonderful book. First of all, this is a very moving story. It centers on a teenage black girl, Starr Carter, who leaves her crime-riddled neighborhood each day to attend an affluent school across town. In both settings, she feels a need to conform to the social norms. This means that she lives a double-life of sorts -- she has one persona with her black family and friends in her neighborhood and another one with her wealthy, predominantly white, friends from her school. One night she attends a party in her neighborhood that turns violent. After leaving the party with her childhood friend, Khalil, her life and her community is forever changed. A routine traffic stop turns tragic when an unarmed Khalil is repeatedly shot by a police officer after failing to follow police instructions. The events of that night serve as the spark that sets off an explosion. Starr's neighborhood has a long-standing animosity for the police, citing multiple instances of police brutality and harassment. The death of Khalil is only the latest in a long line of atrocities. Begrudgingly, Starr is forced into the center of a media feeding frenzy. Part of her wishes that she could just hide and return to her "old" life, while another part wants to be brave and stand up for what she believes is right. She was in an extremely difficult situation for a young girl. Although she initially tries to remain anonymous, as the sole witness of Khalil's murder she eventually speaks out publicly. Doing so, Starr learns a lot about herself and the people that she surrounds herself with. Some will stick around to support her, others will reveal that they were never really who she thought they were. While this book certainly highlighted the issue of police brutality against blacks, there were several other takeaways for me. I applaud the author for not shying away from other issues that are controversial. For example, racism - against multiple races - was prevalent throughout this story. I appreciated that the author was forthcoming in addressing this topic, even knowing that it would likely be controversial. Two wrongs don't make a right. Racism is still racism and it is wrong, regardless of the race. Although I did find the danger of Starr's neighborhood to be exaggerated, the author also highlighted the issue of violent crime, drugs and gang warfare. Several times, there were drive-by shootings or other crimes committed in Starr's neighborhood by the residents against the residents. It was sad and the author did a good job of highlighting this issue/cycle of violence. One notable, older man in the story commented on this and I couldn't have agreed with him more. There was a lot of senseless violence and crime in Starr's neighborhood. As he said, the government needn't look further than that neighborhood to find a real terrorist. The people lived in fear, not only of the police, but of the crime lord in their midst. The conflict in Starr's family over whether to stay in the neighborhood, despite the danger, or move to a safer neighborhood, also was enlightening. There were a lot of mixed feelings and a sense of betrayal that accompanied her parent's desire to "better" their situation and that of their children. It reminded me of that saying about crabs in a bucket, always trying to pull one back in before they can get out. There was certainly plenty of pressure and resentment, both within and outside of her family where this was concerned. They had to balance their desire to improve their situation against the repercussions of being viewed as sell-outs. The same was true for Starr's uncle, who was a police officer. Overall, this was a wonderful book. I'd definitely recommend it to others, regardless of their views. It provides plenty of food for thought and raises awareness of several important social issues.

  19. 4 out of 5

    R.K. Gold

    Wow, talk about a book that can hit you with every emotion possible. Starr's character was so well written that every time she had to interact with her high school friends I cringed at their responses. This is an incredibly powerful book, not just for its political message but for the internal conflict Starr is struggling with. The story was so much deeper than that initial conflict, it really dug into who Starr is and why she feels guilty even though the reader is screaming at the pages "You ha Wow, talk about a book that can hit you with every emotion possible. Starr's character was so well written that every time she had to interact with her high school friends I cringed at their responses. This is an incredibly powerful book, not just for its political message but for the internal conflict Starr is struggling with. The story was so much deeper than that initial conflict, it really dug into who Starr is and why she feels guilty even though the reader is screaming at the pages "You have nothing to feel badly about! You did nothing wrong!" Though I know there are other authors out there with stories like this to tell, it's so great to see this sort of coming of age story receive the commercial success it has. I wish Angie Thomas nothing but success and good fortune in all her future endeavors.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Jessica

    Wow. This book was phenomenal. it completely lived up to the hype. I have a lot of thoughts on this so here they are (keep in mind this is coming from an Asian American from the Bay Area): I loved how educational it was. It really made you understand the Black Lives Matter movement and the reality of it. It hit every single point and put you right in the middle of it. I also liked how Angie Thomas made brought up big points in really subtle ways. For example, “Funny how it works with white kids th Wow. This book was phenomenal. it completely lived up to the hype. I have a lot of thoughts on this so here they are (keep in mind this is coming from an Asian American from the Bay Area): I loved how educational it was. It really made you understand the Black Lives Matter movement and the reality of it. It hit every single point and put you right in the middle of it. I also liked how Angie Thomas made brought up big points in really subtle ways. For example, “Funny how it works with white kids though. It’s dope to be black until it’s hard to be black” (11). That is so true. People only like black culture when it’s cool , but the minute something bad happens to the black community, they distance themselves from it. But the quote that really hit hard was, “Funny. Slave masters thought they were making a difference in black people’s lives too. Saving them from their ‘wild African ways.’ Same Shit, different century. I wish people them would stop thinking that people like me need saving” (246). I read that quote and was like, damn, preach it girl! The minority alliance between Starr and Maya made me so happy. It was so good to see a black girl and her Asian best friend team up. Angie Thomas could have done a bit more with it, but it was still nice to see it included. Personally, I think we need more minority alliances because there is more that unites us than divides us and together we can make a big impact. #Asians4BlackLives I also liked that this tackled interracial dating. It added an extra layer to the complexity of this novel. The pop culture references were a really nice and unexpected touch. I was definitely not expecting High School Musical and the Jonas Brothers to be mentioned in this book. Overall, this book was everything. It should be taught in schools because despite being fiction, it was so informative, thought provoking, and leaves the door open for a lot of discussion.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Romie

    For all the white people who said this book was racist, let me tell you one thing : racism was invented by white people. You can feel prejudiced or discriminated against, but don’t call it racism. I’m a biracial person - hi my dad’s family’s from Vietnam. And as a biracial person I found this book quite hard to read sometimes mostly because of all the comments on interracial relationships. But now again, the way I have to deal with racism isn’t the same way Black people have to deal with it, so o For all the white people who said this book was racist, let me tell you one thing : racism was invented by white people. You can feel prejudiced or discriminated against, but don’t call it racism. I’m a biracial person - hi my dad’s family’s from Vietnam. And as a biracial person I found this book quite hard to read sometimes mostly because of all the comments on interracial relationships. But now again, the way I have to deal with racism isn’t the same way Black people have to deal with it, so obviously the way I react to this book won’t be the same as Black people do. So yes, I see - but still condemn - why white people - mostly - weren’t happy about some subjects of this book, but then again guys, this book isn’t about you, it’s not about how you feel about the BLM movement, not about how you feel ‘insulted’ by a Black man saying he doesn’t trust White people, it’s about what White racist people created throughout the years. YES I felt uncomfortable while reading the comments about interracial relationships in this book but YES I realize it has nothing to do with me - because this book isn’t about my culture - and YES if a Black person tells you you’re being racist you have every right - you’re even encouraged - to shut the hell up because I think they know what racism looks like. Also, to everybody who says racism isn’t a thing anymore …. how dare you ? How dare you ?! Racism is everywhere, I don’t care if you believe it or not, but it is. Racism is taught to us from kindergarten, when someone makes fun of somebody else’s accent, of someone else’s culture, it’s EVERYWHERE so stop saying it doesn’t exist anymore. It does. And people are killed in the name of racism, and they never get the justice they deserve, because YES racism is still a thing, even nowadays in our so called ‘advanced society’. Racism, racism, racism, RACISM. Get used to this word because it’s a reality for a lot of us. And this book shows exactly what I’m talking about, and I was mad while reading it because it hurts to see some people are still so blind, and ignorant, and mean. I also would like to talk about something, because if you don’t know this I’m French and policemen in my country don’t have guns, so I’m not all that familiar - and I’m grateful - with people being killed because they’re people of colour. But unfortunately we’re familiar with people being beaten up sometimes for NOTHING but the medias will always find something to defend the cops who did something wrong. Every single time. If an innocent man gets punched or worse by a policeman, I don’t give a fuck if he sells drugs or anything else, I just don’t care, but what I care about is that this man is basically being told that it’s his fault if the policeman reacted this way. And in this book people say it’s okay if Khalil’s dead because he’s a drug dealer and he would have died anyway … but in what world do we live ? People get MURDERED on assumptions and then it’s their fault ? How the fuck does this sound right to you ? This book is EXTREMELY important. If you think it’s overhyped, then it means there is a problem with you, because this book isn’t. This book is about the truth, the ugly truth. And I liked that it’s explicitly said that all cops aren’t bad cops, all cops aren’t like the one who killed Khalil, because that is important to remember. And the interracial couple was well done. Yes Chris and Starr were cute, but that wasn’t just that. Chris is respectful, he doesn’t try to ‘steal’ Starr’s culture, but he does everything to understand her and learn from his mistakes. And so does Starr. It would be so easy to quit if it was just about me, Khalil, that night, and that cop. It's about way more than that though. It's about Seven. Sekani. Kenya. DeVante. It's also about Oscar. Aiyana. Trayvon. Rekia. Michael. Eric. Tamir. John. Ezell. Sandra. Freddie. Alton. Philando. It's even about this little boy in 1955 who nobody recognized at first - Emmett. The messed-up part ? There are so many more. Yet I think it'll change one day. How ? I don't know. When ? I definitely don't know. Why ? Because there will always be someone ready to fight. Maybe it's my turn. Around the Year in 52 books 2017. 11. A category from another challenge. From the Diversity Bingo Challenge 2017 - POC ON THE COVER.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Hannah Greendale

    Click here to watch a video review of this book on my channel, From Beginning to Bookend. Authentic, funny, and occasionally overlong. The Hate U Give is saturated with poignant messages about community, bravery, and the power of one voice.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Claudia Ramírez

    More like a 4.5 :). I loved this book so much. It made me see things from a different perspective. It educated me.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Trina (Between Chapters)

    Video review (6 Reasons To Read It)- https://youtu.be/XM_c3_KTEX4 YES. Read this. Not only is this a timely and powerful story, but Angie Thomas has the writing range of a seasoned pro. Starr's voice is refreshing, real, and relatable. This book had some of the most well developed characters that I've ever read. Thomas switches gears from writing a basketball game, to a day working retail, to a family dinner, to a prom scene, to a murder, to rioting in the streets without ever missing a beat. It ha Video review (6 Reasons To Read It)- https://youtu.be/XM_c3_KTEX4 YES. Read this. Not only is this a timely and powerful story, but Angie Thomas has the writing range of a seasoned pro. Starr's voice is refreshing, real, and relatable. This book had some of the most well developed characters that I've ever read. Thomas switches gears from writing a basketball game, to a day working retail, to a family dinner, to a prom scene, to a murder, to rioting in the streets without ever missing a beat. It has such a strong sense of family, friendships, community, and self. Seriously, it's the most full, real story I've read in a long time. There is nothing I disliked about it.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Emily (Books with Emily Fox)

    This was an amazing book and completely understand why everyone has been raving about it! It will make you laugh with all the Harry Potter references, cry with all the horrible things that happen and will bring us all closer in our hate for Hailey (kidding... kinda :P) 4.5?

  26. 4 out of 5

    Mary ~Ravager of Tomes~

    ***Special congrats to Angie Thomas for wiping the floor with her competition in the GR Choice Awards 2017!*** 16-year-old Starr Carter's life unravels when she becomes sole witness to the brutal murder of her childhood friend, Khalil Harris. Khalil was an unarmed black boy gunned down by a white police officer. At its core this is a story we've all heard before. It's a story we're seeing an alarming amount of the time on the news these days. It's a story that is powerful & tragic & relev ***Special congrats to Angie Thomas for wiping the floor with her competition in the GR Choice Awards 2017!*** 16-year-old Starr Carter's life unravels when she becomes sole witness to the brutal murder of her childhood friend, Khalil Harris. Khalil was an unarmed black boy gunned down by a white police officer. At its core this is a story we've all heard before. It's a story we're seeing an alarming amount of the time on the news these days. It's a story that is powerful & tragic & relevant. What I enjoyed most about this book was its honest portrayal of modern issues among black communities, and how largely unaware we who are outside of those communities can be. There are a lot of hot topic ideas presented here. ~How both drug and prison industries are designed to keep minorities in a revolving door of failure. ~How the media unabashedly contaminates our ideas about reality. ~How the people paid to protect us don't always consider all of us worth protecting. ~How racism is intentional at times. How racism is unintentional at times. How racism is destructive all of the time. ~How death isn't something we think about until it affects someone we know personally. "Her words used to have power. If she said it was fine, it was fine. But after you've held two people as they took their last breaths, words like that don't mean shit anymore." I think this book has all the elements necessary to make a resounding point; a compelling narrative, believable characters, excellent writing, and an insightful voice can all be found here. This is quite an accomplishment for a debut author, especially given the content she chose to tackle. It addresses those ugly manifestations of hatred, but it also shines a light on the hope we must have for the future. My own personal fear is that those of us who desperately need to read a story like this will not be the ones racing to pick it up. Nonetheless, it's a story that must be told now and preserved for later. Buddy read this with my bby Tweebie! This and other reviews of mine can be found on Book Nest!

  27. 5 out of 5

    Laura

    I want to put this book in everybody's hands. It is so important and SO good. I cannot stress this enough. Anything I say won't even do the book justice. Just know this is a standout novel that will take the world by storm. It is the best book I have read in years by far. I cannot recommend it enough. Inspired by the Black Lives Matter movement, it confronts issues of race and class sending an incredibly powerful message to readers. I cannot help but feel thankful that there is finally a novel th I want to put this book in everybody's hands. It is so important and SO good. I cannot stress this enough. Anything I say won't even do the book justice. Just know this is a standout novel that will take the world by storm. It is the best book I have read in years by far. I cannot recommend it enough. Inspired by the Black Lives Matter movement, it confronts issues of race and class sending an incredibly powerful message to readers. I cannot help but feel thankful that there is finally a novel that does what The Hate U Give does. This is a book that holds such importance, relevance and complete honesty. It is also an undeniably beautiful story about a teenage girl with very real, complex relationships. Sixteen year old Starr is witness to the shooting of her best friend Khalil by a police officer. Khalil was unarmed and doing absolutely nothing wrong. The media gains interest in the shooting where they are portraying Khalil as if he did something wrong to deserve it. The police don't seem interested in finding out what really happened. Starr is scared to speak up about what she witnessed. Will she find her voice for Khalil? What makes this especially interesting is Starr lives two very different lives: one in Garden Heights with her family in the mostly black community and one at her fancy mostly white school Williamson Prep. At school Starr has a white boyfriend, friends, and dials back who she is by talking differently and acting slightly different as if to seem "less black." It broke my heart seeing Starr living two completely separate lives hiding who she is. Starr is a very believable protagonist. The message is extremely important. I myself am inspired and want to do something. This is a book that is exceptionally great. It will make you feel things. Basically no matter what kind of books you enjoy, I highly recommend you read this book.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Donalyn

    Reread. Can we just give Angie Thomas all of the awards right now?

  29. 5 out of 5

    may ➹

    UPDATE DEC 4/5, 2017 Yesterday I found out that this book has been banned in a Texas school district (Katy ISD). And honestly??? I’m so angry right now. Y’all probably don’t know this, but I was born and currently live in Texas (hence my use of the word “y’all”), so I’m just extremely!! frustrated!! with the state I call “home”!!!! The hypothetical reasons for this ban are really, truly, insanely stupid. They say that it might be because of sexual content―sex was literally mentioned only TWICE in UPDATE DEC 4/5, 2017 Yesterday I found out that this book has been banned in a Texas school district (Katy ISD). And honestly??? I’m so angry right now. Y’all probably don’t know this, but I was born and currently live in Texas (hence my use of the word “y’all”), so I’m just extremely!! frustrated!! with the state I call “home”!!!! The hypothetical reasons for this ban are really, truly, insanely stupid. They say that it might be because of sexual content―sex was literally mentioned only TWICE in this book!!! And I’m sure that some books in Katy ISD’s library have more sexual content than this!!! They also say that it might be because of language, and yeah, THUG has a lot of swear words. But again, I’m sure that there are some books in school libraries with just as much language as THUG, and perhaps even more. The last reason is just so SO stupid that I can literally feel my face turning red with anger: The book is banned because of its heavy topics of police brutality. Okay, yeah, it makes total sense for a school library to ban a book that is educating people about issues going on in the country they live in!!! When I read this book, my eyes were opened. Of course I knew that police brutality was happening in America; I just didn’t really grasp its extent. I can’t believe that a school district is banning people’s right to read a book so incredibly important in today’s world, that talks of issues happening RIGHT NOW and need to be addressed. Every student in Katy ISD is being denied this book from their school libraries, when they have every right to be allowed to read it, ESPECIALLY because of the topics that it handles. A school district should be working towards educating their students in a way that they will grow up to be people who will want to change the world for the better, and banning THUG isn’t going to achieve that. The subjects discussed in this book are so so important, and I honestly cannot believe that someone had the audacity to ban such an influential book. They are smothering the voices of almost 3 million black Texans, 45 million black Americans, all because the topics are [raises voice to a whine] “too heavy”. Banning a book does not make the truth any less real, nor any less uncomfortable; it only makes you ignorant. “Texas, o Texas, all hail the mighty state”?? No thanks. P.S. As a form of protest of this stupid ban, you can enter HERE to win 20 copies of THUG for your library or school of choice!!! (US only) ORIGINAL REVIEW------------------------- 4.5 stars. This is a book that everyone needs to read. No matter what race you are, this is just SUCH an important book, and if there’s one book that needs to be assigned to all school reading, it’s this one. It has been a New York Times bestseller for MONTHS, and all for good reason. WHY YOU SHOULD READ THIS BOOK ● It has such an important message. The Hate U Give talks about police brutality in America, and how white policemen are shooting innocent, unarmed black men. It offers a view point from Starr Carter, who witnessed her black friend Khalil’s death at the hands of a white police man. ● It is just so eye-opening. Many people know about this issue. But THUG allows you to perceive the story from a personal viewpoint. It opens your eyes to how some black people are living because of stereotypes and discriminations—and often, they’re not the best lives. Starr has a unique perspective, being from a black neighborhood in a white school, and witnessing racism at its worst, and it just is so enlightening to see this. ● I live in America, and while I knew that incidents like this were happening, I didn’t think it was to this extent. I was clueless and oblivious and blind. So for me to read this book and realize the horrors that are going on in my country… it was shocking. But that’s just another reason why you HAVE to read this book. Because it truly opens your eyes to how far racism towards black people go in America. ● It is so true and realistic. I honestly almost cried several times because of how unfair and unjust the discrimination was. I got so so frustrated?? Not with the book, but with the world—of how something this inhumane and horrifying can happen, and is happening. I’m not even kidding, it was EXTREME frustration, as in I-want-to-throw-this-book-across-the-room-but-I-won’t-because-it’s-a-book frustration, and if a book can make you feel deep emotions like that, you know it’s good. (My BR partner also was frustrated many times, so you know it’s not just me!) ● It’s written… beautifully?? I don’t know, I just find Angie Thomas’ writing style so easy to read and honest and raw. Or maybe it’s just Starr’s voice. Whatever it is, the book was just super enjoyable to read, which helped balance out the fact that the topic it was talking about was so HEAVY. ● The characters are amazing!! Starr is so precious and I just love her. Even tho she wants people to speak up when they witness things like she did, she just can’t find the courage to do it herself. That fear makes her so realistic and relatable and you just root for her the entire book. Her family is JUST as amazing, too. They all have such great relationships with each other—they may have their rough spots but they love each other (and it’s great to see such good family dynamics in YA). ● The pacing is A+. Usually I have lots of problems with the pacing of contemporaries, but this was just perfect. Although I do feel like some of the novel could be cut out because it was so long, I understand that this novel was meant to be very character-focused. ● The ending is just beautiful. It’s not exactly the (view spoiler)[happiest ending, but it is the most realistic, and that’s just what Angie is trying to portray. She presents unfairness and leads you to think of how absolutely HORRIBLE it is… and then reveals that you don’t get justice. It’s worse in real life, and I think it’s such an honest and perfect way to end this book. (hide spoiler)] WHY IT WASN’T A PERFECT BOOK // Racism is a really touchy subject (and personal to me, as I’ve experienced it before as a POC—though not as extreme as in this book), and these are all just my opinions!! ● There was discrimination against white people. This book is trying to promote being kind and supportive of each other, and show how racism isn’t making the world any better. [EDIT] Of course, prejudice and racism are different things, but I personally feel like the book was working to make people aware of black racism and prejudice. ● Because of that, I found the message contradictory at times. HOWEVER, the prejudice towards the white characters definitely does not take away the importance & significance of the message. This also is something that happens in real life and I get that the author was trying to write the book as realistically as possible. I also realize that when Starr and her friends were making prejudiced jokes about whites, they were just that—jokes. [END EDIT] It happens all the time in today’s world, to all races. Even the white people make jokes about the black people in this book. But that still doesn’t make it okay. ● For me, something was lacking. It was an absolutely amazing read and so so powerful & important, but I just feel like something was off?? I really can’t explain it—I know it’s not only me because my BR partner said something was missing for her too. That’s literally the only reason why I knocked off half a star. This book has such high praise from everyone, and it’s not for nothing. This truly is one of the most powerful YA books I’ve ever read, and the message it has so inspiring. In a world today where so many people face racism—even if it’s in the form of a “joke”—this is a book that everyone needs to read. It is SO SO eye-opening and influential. I can’t say it enough, god, just READ THE BOOK. // buddy read with the actual sweetest ever

  30. 4 out of 5

    Laurie Anderson

    I love this book! You will, too! Plenty of others have done a great job summarizing the story, so I won't waste your time with a synopsis. But you should know that this book transported me - I cared so deeply about the characters that it was disorienting when I lifted my eyes from the page. This is an OUTSTANDING novel. I predict it will go down as one of the top titles of 2017. I bow deeply with all respect to Angie Thomas - the craft and imagination and heart she wove into this masterpiece is b I love this book! You will, too! Plenty of others have done a great job summarizing the story, so I won't waste your time with a synopsis. But you should know that this book transported me - I cared so deeply about the characters that it was disorienting when I lifted my eyes from the page. This is an OUTSTANDING novel. I predict it will go down as one of the top titles of 2017. I bow deeply with all respect to Angie Thomas - the craft and imagination and heart she wove into this masterpiece is breathtaking. Run, don't walk, to your bookseller or library and get your copy now.

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